The 7 Day Roguelike Competition for 2007

yakumo9275's picture

The third annual 7DRL challenge is coming! What's a 7DRL? Why its the Roguelike communities answer to the annual IF Competition and the NaNoWriMo thats what!

The date for this years 7DRL is from March 10th to March 18th, you get 168 hours to write a Roguelike.

The rules are simple:

  1. Any time on March 10th or March 11th (as measured in your time zone), post to rec.games.roguelike.development that you have started work on your Seven Day Roguelike.
  2. Write a Roguelike.
  3. After 168 hours, if you have completed a playable Roguelike, post your success to rec.games.roguelike.announce! If not, post your lack of results to rec.games.roguelike.development, where we will all commiserate and agree that given a few scant more hours, it could have been great.

You don't have to write everything from scratch, you can reuse your existing code, engines etc. Write a ToME module, create an angband variant, or write it from scratch. Use pyGame, SDL, LibFov, whatever you like, start planning ahead of time and remember to post to rec.games.roguelike.development announcing your game (rule #1)

There is even talk this year of someone doing a Roguelike for the 2mhz BBC Micro with 32k ram!

see http://roguebasin.roguelikedevelopment.org/index.php?title=7DRL for more information on the compo.

Some interesting mini RL's have come out of the 7DRL competition that have turned into great games like Mt Drash the RL, Castlevania RL, Diablo RL, Dungeon Bash, Letterhunt and You Only Live Once.

I've an idea for a 7DRL entry this year but I don't know if I have the time to do it....

Comments

Bill Loguidice
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I think the one issue with

I think the one issue with that contest is that people can start writing NOW, rather than just take the roughly eight days they're supposed to. What should have happened was have the contest announced, then mention a "surprise" element that needs to be incorporated into the game on the 9th. This way it would ensure that at least some of the writing was done during the actual timeline given.

Don't get me wrong, I love the idea of creating new Rogue-like games - they're always fun to play - I just don't see what advantage there is to this particular ruleset.

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
(A PC Magazine Top 100 Website)
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Bill Loguidice
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Out of curiosity, yakumo,

Out of curiosity, yakumo, have you played CryptRL? (I haven't) It looks especially impressive, like a fusion of classic CRPG's and Rogue... http://cryptmaster.free.fr/SITE/screenshots.php5

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
(A PC Magazine Top 100 Website)
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Matt Barton
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I agree with Bill--seems

I agree with Bill--seems like you're relying pretty much on an honor system here! Even with a surprise element, there's no way of knowing if someone hasn't already gotten a Roguelike done and just needs to add in the element. The only way this would work would be for people to meet at a camp or some such where the environment could be carefully controlled.

That said, I like the idea of a roguelike contest. As you know, I entered the IF Comp last year and had a great time learning C++. I can't help but be tempted to now try my hand at a roguelike. Not going to happen this year, though! They really ought to do this kind of stuff in the summer, when people have more time.

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Bill Loguidice
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Matt Barton wrote:They
Matt Barton wrote:

They really ought to do this kind of stuff in the summer, when people have more time.

ha ha, the only reason why you have more time in the summer is because you're a teacher!

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Bill Loguidice, Managing Director
Armchair Arcade, Inc.
(A PC Magazine Top 100 Website)
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Matt Barton
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Hey, that's about the only

Hey, that's about the only perk we get! ;-P

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yakumo9275
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Bill, Ive not tried cryptrl

Bill, Ive not tried cryptrl but Ive been playing some Escape Mt Drash RL which is really cool. ( http://www.santiagoz.com/web/news.php ). its java, and has configurable tileset (from ultima iii, ascii etc). I like it.

Matt, As for the compo, yeah its honor system. Its only the third year (and 4th compo, there were two last year). The RL dev community is very tiny.

I have a neat idea (nothing like doom-rl or castlevania rl!) but its just finding time. (plus I am working toward releasing my non 7drl roguelike as well).

Matt, btw, what was the reason you didnt try inform or tads or alan etc for the if compo (i'm an if junkie!).

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Matt Barton
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yakumo9275 wrote:Matt, btw,
yakumo9275 wrote:

Matt, btw, what was the reason you didnt try inform or tads or alan etc for the if compo (i'm an if junkie!)

Heh, I have been asked this question a thousand times! ;-) Basically, my goal was to learn to C++, and I did that by programming a text adventure game. I figured a text adventure was a significant enough challenge for me at this stage. I quickly found out, though, that while it's relatively easy to program a "simple" text parser, doing the job right (i.e., up to Infocom standards or beyond) would really require a massive amount of work. It's exciting stuff, though, and I really think the next generation IF should take advantage of data mining and expert systems techniques to really up the ante. It seems like the hardest part to get right is not so much guessing what the player wants the avatar to do, but rather generating believable responses to wild inputs. Language is infinite, so there is no way to ever make a system that could simply spit out a pre-programmed response to every possible input. Rather, the system would have to use comparative analysis and determine which of a set of pre-programmed responses would be most appropriate for that given situation. If we ever want to succeed in this, we have to stop thinking in terms of the "correct response" and think instead of many acceptable responses.

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