Matt Interviews Megan Gaiser and Robert Riedl

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This week, I chat with Megan Gaiser (President) and Robert Riedl (Executive Producer) of Her Interactive. Hear the history of this risky but ultimately highly successful venture into the world of Nancy Drew and games for girls.

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Mark Vergeer
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Wow

The wife actually knew about Nancy Drew so I guess that it was at least known here in the Netherlands as well. Or it could have been that she got exposed to it the years the family spent in Austria.
Anyways great Matt chatt this one.

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Matt Barton
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Thanks, Mark. I wasn't sure

Thanks, Mark. I wasn't sure how this one would go down given the subject matter. I guess people are open-minded enough to explore new topics.

I obviously need to do some tweaking on my audio again; for some reason, their mic was a lot louder than mine (though I thought I had mine cranked up to the max). Argh. Anyway, it was neat having the split signal to work with (I used supertintin)--just too bad the resolution is so low that the close-ups look like crap. I'm starting to think there's just no substitute for being on-site with a real camera.

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Keith Burgun
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Silly

The concept of "games for girls" is silly, just as the concept of "games for boys" is equally silly. Games are for everyone, and we as a culture need to start learning to look past theme and art and look at a game for what it really is: a system of mechanics.

Mark Vergeer
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Silly or not silly .... I think therefore I am...
Keith Burgun wrote:

The concept of "games for girls" is silly, just as the concept of "games for boys" is equally silly. Games are for everyone, and we as a culture need to start learning to look past theme and art and look at a game for what it really is: a system of mechanics.

Males and females are wired differently. We are equals but both sides of the human race do favor different things. Like two sides of the same coin. And no I am not any anti-feminist, old-school biggot. Some generalizations can be made but of course there are huge inter-personal variations.
Women are better at multi-tasking, have a knack for communication and actually use more words per day in general than males. Women can utter more than 20,000 words per day whereas studies have shown that men are known to speak less than 10,000 per day. The mind of a woman never stops thinking whereas the mind of a male can be perfectly blank for minutes on end.
It comes as no surprise that despite feminism/woman-emancipation (being far more successful over here in the Netherlands then in other places around the world) women and men still prefer different cultural things n general. Of course there are men who like chick-flicks (I do, to a certain extend) but most of these movies will be wasted on the ' generic male ' individual. And yes there are women who are big into multiplayer FPSs but most players of these games will be male. Puzzle games have a huge women user base which is significantly larger than males in quite a few instances.

Like Christina said in the podcast, it may still have to do with the fact that despite the emancipation of the modern woman she still has less time on her hands than the emancipated male. So when games are enjoyed women tend to choose more casual games (arcade, puzzle) and men tend to choose more hard-core games (fps, MMORPGs) just because both genders generally have a different amount of leisure time. And of course there are always exceptions.

So Keith I happen do disagree with you when you say the concept is 'silly' as both sides of the human race are potential customers for the games industry and need to be addressed appropriately.
Besides, the 'public' will appraise a game not for it's 'game mechanics' but for the gameplay and the 'sauce' of art and theme that has been poured over it. It has to have a certain appeal or 'click' with a person, right?
Simple game mechanics may apply for simple arcade-style/puzzle games but for games featuring a story line it is harder to separate the two. What about the convergence of story-telling and game-play in games like Heavy Rain or Silent Hill?

It's not as simplistic and/or silly as you want us to believe. Or is it?

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Rob Daviau
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(No subject)

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Mark Vergeer
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That says it all!

LOL Rob, I think that says it all!

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