Abandonia Times Issue 2 now available for download

Matt Barton's picture

Abandonia TimesAbandonia TimesGreat news! Abandonia Times has just released their second issue, and it's available now over at The Abandonia Times website. The theme of the issue is "Doom and Horror," and there's a slew of articles on Doom, a history of horror games piece, Noctropolis, and Super Fighter vs. Sango Fighter (heh, remember that one?).

Oh, and also a huge interview with yours truly. :)

There's a lot of meat here, so get over there right now and check it out. From the editor: allow me to boast about the variety of the articles: we have freeware and console reviews, we have history articles, two interviews with two interesting people that marked the gaming industry in their own unique way, and a wide selection of non-DOOM PC game reviews which are at least tangentially related to horror.

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Rowdy Rob
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Joined: 09/04/2006
Awesome issue!

I'm quite amazed at this "Abandonia Times" magazine! Excellent interview.... I wish it was longer.

The rest of the articles are first-rate. I highly recommend everyone download this issue pronto!

TRU Gamer (not verified)
Waste of my valuable time

Boyo, you know this mag is scraping the bottom of the barrell if their interviewing people who interview, and not even doing that well. that site should be shut down anyway for stealing IP. Considering youre credentials Im surprised you associate with theives.

Bill Loguidice
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Your "valuable time" indeed...
TRU Gamer wrote:

Boyo, you know this mag is scraping the bottom of the barrell if their interviewing people who interview, and not even doing that well. that site should be shut down anyway for stealing IP. Considering youre credentials Im surprised you associate with theives.

Wow, what an ignorant comment. Good thing it was said anonymously to protect the foolish...

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Matt Barton
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Joined: 01/16/2006
So what's your solution, Tru

So what's your solution, Tru Lamer? Never play any game that isn't still commercially available?

I guess we should also go through our libraries and burn all the books that are no longer being published. Hmm, guess that's about 99% of them.

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TRU Gamer (not verified)
Subject is Law

Gee, Ad hominem much?

Are you sure your a professer, Mister Matt Barton? I know I would lose sleep over someone like you "teaching." Then again, considering the flaming liberals at universities, no surprise that you would be supporting the crooks over the legal owners.

Unless the owner of the softwares has released it into the public domain or gave you explicit permission, it IS STEALING. I know about Abandonia and their policies are CRIMINAL. They say they will take down a file only if a copyright holder claims it. That's like saying "It's not stealing if you just take things from my house and I don't notice its missing." Weather the owner is AWARE it is being stolen does not make it LEGAL or RIGHT. It is ILLEGAL and WRONG.

Whoever owns the copyright to these games is losing money when you steal it. If you say, Well we don't even know who it is, so go ahead and steal it. That's like the scum who steals from abandoned construction sites. Oh I could use that rocks for my garden. Nobody will notice if I just drive my truck up here and get a bunch of it. Just because you dont know whose stuff it is does NOT make it right.

abandonware sites are like grave robbing. Oh that person is dead they dont need it. Well, your religious beliefs may differ, but I would think that would be wrong. But even if not, that person has family, and looting there stuff is wrong.

You can justify it however you want, but in the end you and Mr. Bill Loguidice will be sorry.

Bill Loguidice
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Joined: 12/31/1969
Yes, anonymous, your

Yes, anonymous, your well-spelled attacks, clear mastery of the English language, and intimate knowledge of the law have clearly made everyone re-think everything. Thank you, kind troll.

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Anonymous (not verified)
I take it you're not aware

I take it you're not aware that in many cases the designers of the games openly support abandonware sites because they know that with the game publishers not willing to provide tech support or promotion for outdated games, those sites are the only way people will ever continue to enjoy their hard work?

Andy

Chip Hageman
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Joined: 10/06/2010
Rocks from Heaven! I can't believe my bounty of rocks!
TRU Gamer wrote:

That's like the scum who steals from abandoned construction sites. Oh I could use that rocks for my garden. Nobody will notice if I just drive my truck up here and get a bunch of it. Just because you dont know whose stuff it is does NOT make it right.

Abandoned? sure, if someone can use the rocks.. take them. at least they'll be put to some use.

As to abandonware.. Abandonia removes files from the site when they are picked up for commercial re-release. Fine by me.. It's not about stealing intellectual property.. it's about the market not offering paid alternatives. If a company wants draconian control over it's IP (which is well within it's rights), then offer alternatives to legally purchase the content... or, well.. keep quite.

Throw game XYZ on GoG for 5-10 bucks and you will have converted a thief to a customer. Or just be lazy about your old IP (like most companies) and whine that people are stealing your rocks.

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Matt Barton
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The sad part is I can't

The sad part is I can't really argue with some of his points.

Disney used to have a habit of intentionally making their films unavailable or 7 years, then releasing them back in theaters. The idea was that a whole new generation of 7-year olds would be available to watch their films for the first time. I can understand the logic of that. Now, of course, that's impossible, because even if Disney refused to release them on DVD or whatever, you could easily acquire them legally via eBay or illegally by torrents. In short, that idea stopped being practical with VHS and Betamax, much less the stuff available now. Seems like the best they can hope for now is releasing the same old stuff on updated media, such as Blu-Ray and/or 3D conversions. If Disney tries to cut off the legal supply, all it does is pump up the black market, so to speak. So they're better off making some money than none.

Imagine if the copyright holders of Pac-Man were able to totally prevent anyone from playing it for 7 years. Then suddenly they released it again. I'm sure they could charge a huge price for the privilege, particularly if they were able to enforce the law. I know there have been efforts to do precisely that, charging $20 or more for classic arcade games since they are the only legit way to play them on certain platforms, such as the GBA. How much would you pay to play Pac-Man or Tetris on a proprietary system if you hadn't been able to play them for nearly a decade? I'm sure a lot of novices who know nothing about emulation have gladly paid high prices to play lots of classics. There's a good chance that they'd pay even more for rare, obscure games that meant a lot to them but few others, such as TRS-80 games.

So, in short, shutting down all the abandonware and emulation sites probably would increase the value of those IPs, but it might also backfire. If nobody is able to play a game for a long period, it might well just be forgotten. Re-releasing it might have no effect other than, "Huh?" It's also possible that keeping the title alive via abandonware might make some people more interested in collecting the original cartridge, or at least perk up when they hear about an update, remake, or even just that it's legally available somewhere.

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Chip Hageman
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Joined: 10/06/2010
Gravy train
Matt Barton wrote:

The sad part is I can't really argue with some of his points.

The main problem with IP laws is that while "the law is the law" it will never work with todays technology. The genie is out of the bottle and no matter what kind of media you want to talk about (games, music, movies, books, tv) there is no way to practically "protect" it.

The answer is very simple.. the problem is that nobody likes the answer. Which is to charge less for the content... then people may opt to buy over pirate. In the end you'll probably do about the same (compared to prior decades) when you aggregate the sales over time. The problem is that the old model (i.e. artists getting raped by their publishers (management wise, anyway) who are over-payed (when compared to content creators)) raise prices to secure a similar overinflated salary like they had in previous years. Then they wonder why they are getting robbed blind.

The only way to fix this is for publishers, distributors and artists to realize that the gravy train ain't coming back to town (not that the artists ever got to ride that particular train).

- No one is waiting for a Disney classic to come out of the vault..
- No one is waiting seven years to rediscover Pac-Man.

The world is everyone's oyster.. and whether you created the content or not, you need to be competitive or people will find other alternatives. Right or wrong, most folks are out of work and broke these days... and you can't jail the planet.

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