Online watchface-generator for the Pebble watch with bonus Armchair Arcade face

Bill Loguidice's picture

Pebble Armchair Arcade FacePebble Armchair Arcade FacePaul, aka @prode81 on Twitter, has made available one of the first Pebble watch apps, a nifty Web browser-based watch face generator. The link is here, and it's a simple, but great way to experiment with your own Pebble watch without knowing a lick of programming. Check the image below to see how the Armchair Arcade watch face turned out, plus you can scan the QR code with your phone to put it on your own Pebble. If you like Paul's work, don't forget to donate!

Pebble Armchair Arcade Face QR CodePebble Armchair Arcade Face QR Code or http://www.watchface-generator.de/watchfaces/20130424/armchairarcade_1/.

Armchair Arcade Pebble Watch Face

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Matt Barton
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WOW!

WOW!

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Chip Hageman
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Looks interesting... First

Looks interesting... First time I've heard about this watch, actually.. Reminds me of the old calculator watches... may as well have been strapping an old TI Calculator to your wrist.. :-)

But if it has a built in browser, I guess it's nice to have _some_ screen real estate.

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Bill Loguidice
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The Pebble watch

Chip Hageman wrote:
Looks interesting... First time I've heard about this watch, actually.. Reminds me of the old calculator watches... may as well have been strapping an old TI Calculator to your wrist.. :-) But if it has a built in browser, I guess it's nice to have _some_ screen real estate.

It does not have a built-in browser, nor is it all that big. It receives texts and other alerts from iOS and Android phones. You can change the watchface and other properties of the watch. It's mostly to receive notifications, though. The image is an actual watchface. I'm surprised you haven't heard of it before because it was one of the first big Kickstarters... I can't necessarily recommend it as it doesn't do much for the price, but I don't mind having it. I'm more intrigued at this point by what Apple, Samsung, and Microsoft have cooking for the wrist...

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Chip Hageman
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Oddly enough, I don't wear a

Oddly enough, I don't wear a watch anymore, because I always carry my phone with me. I'm not sure if I'm odd in that regard, but wearing a watch that alerts me to information on a phone that I carry in my pocket seems a bit redundant. Having said that, I am intrigued by Google Glass which has a similar, albeit a bit extended, use case.

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Matt Barton
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I thought the same until I

I thought the same until I went back to wearing one:
http://www.amazon.com/Casio-CA53W-Databank-Calculator-Watch/dp/B000GB1R7S

It's very nice to learn the time just by looking at your wrist instead of having to dig out your phone from your pocket and hit the power button.

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Bill Loguidice
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The future

Chip Hageman wrote:
Oddly enough, I don't wear a watch anymore, because I always carry my phone with me. I'm not sure if I'm odd in that regard, but wearing a watch that alerts me to information on a phone that I carry in my pocket seems a bit redundant. Having said that, I am intrigued by Google Glass which has a similar, albeit a bit extended, use case.

Matt summed it up well, i.e., there is a certain convenience factor to glancing at your wrist and seeing if something is important enough to get your phone from your pocket or another part of the house. It's handy, but obviously not essential. What's nice is that this watch sticks to the basic and nails those, so there are few frustrations. The ePaper display is simple and clean and the waterproof watch doesn't need charging more than once a week or so.

I'm definitely intrigued by Google Glass and will likely covet one, but probably not until the price gets to $300 or less. It's not going to reach consumers until at least 2014 anyway, so we have time for the market of wearable devices to mature further and more entries from the likes of Apple, Samsung and Microsoft, which can only be a good thing (if sometimes only to see what we DON'T want/need).

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Matt Barton
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Agreed--Google Glass looks

Agreed--Google Glass looks like it could be huge. I have to wear glasses anyway, and it's always bugged me that they're one-use devices. If I'm going to be lugging something around on my person all day, everyday, I want it to have more than one function. GG, assuming it could be integrated into a regular pair of glasses, looks like it could do that in a major way.

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Bill Loguidice
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Google Glass

Matt Barton wrote:
GG, assuming it could be integrated into a regular pair of glasses, looks like it could do that in a major way.

That's the promise, that it can either clip onto regular glasses in one form or it will come preinstalled in your prescription glasses (perhaps via Warby Parker, a service that I recommend). That combined with genuine all-day battery life are key to wide consumer success. If not, we're talking a product doomed to a niche.

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Matt Barton
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I didn't even think about the

I didn't even think about the battery life. I wish they'd figure out a better batter soon. I'm stunned that it's 2013 and we're still worried about battery life! I figured we'd have some kind of permanent (or at least multi-year) battery solution figured out by now.

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Shawn Delahunty
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Battery Life

We would have long-life batteries, but everybody keeps "Turning up the voltage" so to speak. It's one of the things that I harp on continually as an embedded systems programmer.

Everyone wants the "slick programming interface" and improved development times, and thus they keep throwing faster and faster processors & chips at the same sets of problems. This is necessary to accommodate all the extra libraries & underlying support code that makes "slick programming APIs" seem so "easy/fast". As such, even though the chips use "less power to do the same thing", we're making them do 10-times the things as previously, just to accomplish the same overall task.

Too many layers of software... too lackadaisical of developers.

However, some of the recent lab work with graphene, when it's made into a repeatable industrial process, could begin solving the problem for our electric culture. Look into "Hyper Capacitors" for some of the possibilities. Imagine something the size of a couple D-cell batteries, with enough power storage to jump-start several cars in a row, which can be re-charged in a minute or 2. That's what may be possible.

(However, don't get it wet. Or feed it after midnight....)

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