google

Bill Loguidice's picture

Armchair Arcade on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and RSS

Did you know that you can keep track of the latest from Armchair Arcade not only through your favorite RSS feed reader, but also on the top social networks? That's right, whether you're a Facebook, Twitter, or Google+ fan, we've got a page for you. Click any of the links to check us out!

Mark Vergeer's picture

Chrome stops supporting third party plug-ins

ChromeChrome Google is joining together their YouTube and the Google+ platforms, whether users like it or not, but also has something else up its sleeve. By January, Google strives to have complete control over Chrome extensions and will turn off support for all third party extensions that are not downloaded from the Chrome Web Store. This all to supposedly make the browser a safer one.

Downloading Chrome extensions outside of Google's Web store will be prohibited come January. Until then, it is possible to download and manually install third party extensions on the Windows version of the popular Google browser. You can still do so by dragging the extensions to the Chrome://Extensions/ folder.

With this action, Google will gain complete control over their Web browser. Only Google will be able to decide which extensions will and will not be included in the store. A sign of things to come is the fact that earlier this year Google already removed ' Adblock' and ' Adaway' from the Google Play Store. And in January this will be a reality on Windows too.

Developers who want to publish an extension for the Windows Chrome version will have to pay a 5 dollar registration fee, and Google will take 5% off any revenues...

Mark Vergeer's picture

Nexus 7 and Retrogaming (Emulation) with the iCade ' 8-bitty ' gamepad

Showing the iCade 8-bitty blue-tooth game pad controller that works with the Nexus 7 - straight out of the box without having to root it or anything. It is primarily designed for use with iOS but works great with Android as well as you can see. Read more below.

Mark Vergeer's picture

ARCHOS Gamepad Web Browsing and Speed Comparison with Nexus 7

A request by a viewer to show something of the browsing experience on the Archos device - very comparable to other devices on the market. And the speed.

ARCHOS Gamepad Specs:
http://www.archos.com/products/gamepad/specs.html?country=gb&lang=en&#a

ARCHOS Gamepad Overview:
http://www.archos.com/products/gamepad/index.html?country=gb&lang=en&p=1#a

NOTICE:
"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Mark Vergeer's picture

ARCHOS Gamepad Review / In-depth look (the long 1h57m edition)

Update January 2nd 2013: There is a new firmware update for the Gamepad that is supposed to fix the buttons cancelling each other out. Preliminary testing shows no lag when analog nub is used. More testing will be done and I probably will end up doing a new review as this update does seem to drastically fix all the things that were wrong with the device with the release firmware. Still too early to tell but I will definitely update my review. Read more below.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Google Nexus 7 - a more in depth look (HD)

Where to get your bearings in Android and the Nexus 7? Well check out the following pages mentioned in the video:
The Nexus 7 beginner's guide by Shane R.Monroe:
http://www.reviewlagoon.com/?p=723

Green Robot Gamer: Real gaming on Android devices:
http://wiki.greenrobotgamer.com/

The emulators from Robert Broglia:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/developer?id=Robert+Broglia

Excellent site with a a lot of interesting articles:
http://www.reviewlagoon.com/

Okay so after fiddling around with my new Nexus 7 I proceeded to do some more serious things with it. Of course I want to be able to use USB thumbdrives and what have you so Rooting the device and installing software that makes the device capable of writing to USB thumbdrives was essential.

Propriocepsis is the system your body uses to interpret the position of joints and tension in muscles. A system really needed when playing with touch controls as tactile feedback is not available touching a glass surface for buttons.

NOTICE:
"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Mark Vergeer's picture

Google Nexus - Unboxing

I bit the bullet and got myself a Nexus7, seems good value for money and it is an excellent way to experience the Android ecosystem.

The magically floating camera aka camera girl observed and registered! Enjoy.

Of course more will follow.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Thoughts on Google's Big Reveals

Hot on the heels of yesterday's striking Vizio Co-Star announcement - a proper Google TV device for $99 that also happens to incorporate the excellent OnLive streaming game service - was Google's big I/O event today. There were several major reveals, including the nifty features of the next version of the Android operating system, Jellybean; the Nexus 7 7" tablet; the Google Nexus Q, a streaming media device that's made in the USA; and Project Glass, Google's upcoming augmented reality glasses. Let's take each one of these in order:

Bill Loguidice's picture

The HP TouchPad Fiasco from an Author's Perspective and Comments on the Industry as a Whole

Here's a famous quote that sums up the reaction to yesterday's surprise announcement by HP to stop supporting webOS, and, by extension, the TouchPad tablet, as well as get out of the PC business, courtesy of the classic 1968 film, The Planet of the Apes: "YOU MANIACS! YOU BLEW IT UP! OH, DAMN YOU! GODDAMN YOU ALL TO HELL!". We all knew that Hewlett-Packard CEO Leo Apotheker was a software guy, we just didn't realize that meant he'd pull the rug out from under consumers and do a dramatic IBM-style business shift. At least we can still buy their printers, right? ... Anyone?

This affects me personally, because I was working on TouchPad For Dummies, which would have been my third book for 2011, to go along with the recently released, Motorola ATRIX For Dummies, and the upcoming, My Xbox: Kinect, Xbox 360, and Xbox LIVE. While these events are much bigger than me and others will be affected far more dramatically, I thought I would still give my personal impressions, starting first with a little background on the book stuff, some discussion of the TouchPad itself, and then get a bit more into an analysis of the present situation within the industry.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Back in my day we used something called a "desktop computer" that stayed in one place, and we liked it!

I had recently written about what I perceive to be the false notion of console gaming holding PC gaming back (and, frankly, with a recent release like L.A. Noire and future releases like Skyrim, again, it's hard to make that argument outside of a purely superficial (audio/visual) - not contentual - standpoint). Perhaps, as this new article puts forth, it's not consoles, but tablets, that the traditional PC industry has more to worry about?

Of course, as far as I'm concerned, we're actually still at least a few years off from that happening, at least until Apple breaks the required link between their iOS devices and a computer equipped with iTunes (and that's a question of "when", not "if"). Android devices are of course close to completely breaking free of the computer tether, but there are other issues for those classes of devices to overcome first. Other tablet OS's, present and future, are probably somewhere in-between the two.

Interestingly, there's a girl here at my day job who had bought an iPad 2 about a month back and then recently got an iPhone 4, but was frustrated that there was no way to copy what was on her iPad 2 (purchases) over to the iPhone 4. You see, she considers her computer horribly outdated and really didn't want to go through iTunes on her rickety old PC! Obviously, very flawed thinking, but it's very interesting what the non-techies have in their thought processes (and in this case how she wants to basically compute outside of work exclusively on the iPad 2 and iPhone 4)... Definitely a paradigm shift of some type! In any case, it's the old argument that it's not so much computers that are being challenged, it's the limited generalized definition of what a computer is that is being challenged. Does a computer really mean that desktop or laptop many of use a good portion of the day? Sure, but that's not all it means. As an iPad 2 user - outside of the tethering restriction for the occasional iTunes sync - I can argue that my tablet is as much of a computer as most desktops and laptops, with strikingly similar functionality (and in some cases, then some).

Ultimately, I think it's clear we're all headed to a connected eco-system of devices, where a lot of stuff is in the cloud, with minimal need for local storage. You'll simply use whatever device is handy or whatever is best suited to a particular task (say a touch screen or a keyboard). We even already have brilliantly functional cloud gaming services (and of course, VOD, like Netflix), so, outside of artificial bandwidth restrictions by ISP's, there's little reason to think that the future has anything to do with increasingly more powerful traditional computers. For some of us who have been in love with technology since our earliest memories, this is a tough sell, but it's hard to argue that's not where we're headed, and perhaps it's just as hard to argue that it's even a bad a thing. I'm sure even the most hardcore among us have tired of the upgrade/incompatibility/instability cycle at some point, if only briefly.

Syndicate content