netbook

Mark Vergeer's picture

Experiencing Android 4.4.2 R1 Kitkat (x86) on a core2duo desktop Natively (part 3 on x86 Android)


In this video I demonstrate the Android 4.4 Kitkat x86 release on my HP Compac desktop small form factor PC. It works even better than the Akoya Medion E1222 netbook. Below are the hardware specs of the PC I am using in this demonstration.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Experiencing Android 4.4.2 R1 Kitkat (x86) on an Intel Netbook Natively (part 2 on x86 Android)


In this video I demonstrate the Android 4.4 Kitkat x86 release on my Akoya E1222 netbook (hardware specs below) as Windows 7 Starter Edition wasn't really working smoothly on this machine. I did use Ubuntu on it very successfully but with the new X86 Android release I just had to try it. Check out the video to see how I did.
It supports all my hardware out of the box! And it supports the Google Playstore out of the box!

x86 Android can be found here: http://www.android-x86.org/

Mark Vergeer's picture

Installing Android 4.4.2 R1 Kitkat (x86) on my Intel Netbook Natively (Part 1 on x86 Android)

In this article I install the Android 4.4 Kitkat x86 release on my Akoya M1222 netbook as Windows 7 Starter Edition wasn't really working smoothly on this machine. I did use Ubuntu on it very successfully but with the new X86 Android release I just had to try it. Check out the video to see how I did.
It supports all my hardware out of the box and it fully supports the Google Playstore out of the box! [Read more] below to find out where to obtain x86 Android and information on how to install it.

Bill Loguidice's picture

Back in my day we used something called a "desktop computer" that stayed in one place, and we liked it!

I had recently written about what I perceive to be the false notion of console gaming holding PC gaming back (and, frankly, with a recent release like L.A. Noire and future releases like Skyrim, again, it's hard to make that argument outside of a purely superficial (audio/visual) - not contentual - standpoint). Perhaps, as this new article puts forth, it's not consoles, but tablets, that the traditional PC industry has more to worry about?

Of course, as far as I'm concerned, we're actually still at least a few years off from that happening, at least until Apple breaks the required link between their iOS devices and a computer equipped with iTunes (and that's a question of "when", not "if"). Android devices are of course close to completely breaking free of the computer tether, but there are other issues for those classes of devices to overcome first. Other tablet OS's, present and future, are probably somewhere in-between the two.

Interestingly, there's a girl here at my day job who had bought an iPad 2 about a month back and then recently got an iPhone 4, but was frustrated that there was no way to copy what was on her iPad 2 (purchases) over to the iPhone 4. You see, she considers her computer horribly outdated and really didn't want to go through iTunes on her rickety old PC! Obviously, very flawed thinking, but it's very interesting what the non-techies have in their thought processes (and in this case how she wants to basically compute outside of work exclusively on the iPad 2 and iPhone 4)... Definitely a paradigm shift of some type! In any case, it's the old argument that it's not so much computers that are being challenged, it's the limited generalized definition of what a computer is that is being challenged. Does a computer really mean that desktop or laptop many of use a good portion of the day? Sure, but that's not all it means. As an iPad 2 user - outside of the tethering restriction for the occasional iTunes sync - I can argue that my tablet is as much of a computer as most desktops and laptops, with strikingly similar functionality (and in some cases, then some).

Ultimately, I think it's clear we're all headed to a connected eco-system of devices, where a lot of stuff is in the cloud, with minimal need for local storage. You'll simply use whatever device is handy or whatever is best suited to a particular task (say a touch screen or a keyboard). We even already have brilliantly functional cloud gaming services (and of course, VOD, like Netflix), so, outside of artificial bandwidth restrictions by ISP's, there's little reason to think that the future has anything to do with increasingly more powerful traditional computers. For some of us who have been in love with technology since our earliest memories, this is a tough sell, but it's hard to argue that's not where we're headed, and perhaps it's just as hard to argue that it's even a bad a thing. I'm sure even the most hardcore among us have tired of the upgrade/incompatibility/instability cycle at some point, if only briefly.

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