handheld

Mark Vergeer's picture

The Archos Gamepad - a lot of things are fixed - revisited after 1st firmware update

My 1st review of Dec 24th revisited. With the new firmware update I'd give this device a much higher end-score. 7.5 out of 10 or 75% of 100. Much if not all software issues with buttons cancelling each other out have been removed with the firmware update. Also the lag and flickering screen with the Archos mapping tool have been removed. Very nice. It brings the device up to a standard it really should have been when it was released. Read more below.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Nexus 7 and Retrogaming (Emulation) with the iCade ' 8-bitty ' gamepad

Showing the iCade 8-bitty blue-tooth game pad controller that works with the Nexus 7 - straight out of the box without having to root it or anything. It is primarily designed for use with iOS but works great with Android as well as you can see. Read more below.

Mark Vergeer's picture

ARCHOS Gamepad Web Browsing and Speed Comparison with Nexus 7

A request by a viewer to show something of the browsing experience on the Archos device - very comparable to other devices on the market. And the speed.

ARCHOS Gamepad Specs:
http://www.archos.com/products/gamepad/specs.html?country=gb&lang=en&#a

ARCHOS Gamepad Overview:
http://www.archos.com/products/gamepad/index.html?country=gb&lang=en&p=1#a

NOTICE:
"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Mark Vergeer's picture

ARCHOS Gamepad Review / In-depth look (the long 1h57m edition)

Update January 2nd 2013: There is a new firmware update for the Gamepad that is supposed to fix the buttons cancelling each other out. Preliminary testing shows no lag when analog nub is used. More testing will be done and I probably will end up doing a new review as this update does seem to drastically fix all the things that were wrong with the device with the release firmware. Still too early to tell but I will definitely update my review. Read more below.

Mark Vergeer's picture

Revo K101 demonstration and comparion with the K1GBA - Other handhelds & the future of gaming

This hand-held is a 99-100% GBA, GBC hardware compatible game system. It is 99-100% software compatible with GBA, GBC, GB, NES through loading game files off a SD-card. The form factor and looks of the system can seem familiar as it uses the same case as the Gemei A330 aka Dingoo - but mind you this is not the same system. Compared with the original GBA case the system is about the same size, also the screen is about the same size but of a much higher resolution. The angle of the B and A buttons on the original is less steep than the diamond orientation of the Y X B A button layout on the Revo. The screen is not protected by a layer of glass, just a layer of plastic so you need to be a little careful. Don't put it in trousers but put it in the provided sack or pouch.

The camera I use barfed in this video - footage is very blueish so doesn't do the screen of the system justice - the camera makes it very blue with very little red. That's a camera thing. Just check out how it picked up my Nexus 7 - also quite blue so the camera :(

The system touts PC Engine and SMS, GG compatibility but the PCEngine emulation is far too slow. The GG and SMS games don't run full speed. GBA, GBC, GB and NES does.

Last year a SoC was designed based around the hardware of the original Game Boy Advance. It uses a dual core ARM architecture and instead of relying on software emulation to run GBA games, it is capable of running them natively.

Basically it is a hardware-reimplementation of the original GBA. And as a result it supposedly functions in almost exactly the same way as the original Nintendo hardware.This should provide a higher compatiblity- and accuracy-rate. It is possible to use GBA accesories and link the system up to another GBA, K1GBA or RevoK101. It also features video-out that works on a separate jackplug so the link cable can be used while the system is used on the television. The cable (composite) provides monoaural sound.

The real time clock allows for the Pokemon games to function 100% which is a big plus for a lot of Pokemon gamers out there.

What I wonder is if this system has any more advanced features compared to the original GBA (is there overhead) that allows for the installation or implementation of another operating system that opens up the hardware to more advanced emulation software of other systems. But that may not be the case as this seems to pretty much hardware duplicate the original GBA hardware.

The battery used in the K1GBA (the GBA-SP clone is the same one as the battery used in the original GBA-SP). The battery used in the RevoK101 is a clone of the Nokia BL-5B. Order one of these and you got an excellent replacement for the built-in battery.

Where can you get this system? The price is about $60 (~£40) €50 and for that price you practially can't refuse this.

Well you can get one here:
http://www.k1gbasp.com

The GBA-SP one you can get here:
http://www.k1gba.com

The RevoK101 website:
http://revok101.com

NOTICE:
"Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."

Mark Vergeer's picture

NeoGeo-X hooked it up and took a closer look

Okay I hooked up the NeoGeo-X and played on it. In 'console' form it is less disappointing for me. The experience playing the NeoGeo classics is actually fun. The Arcade joystick is precise and works well - although it does feel cheaper and nor as durable as the real deal. Read more below...

Mark Vergeer's picture

NeoGeo-X Unboxing and first impressions - a faulty unit? Not too happy

I think my expectations of this device were a bit too high and comparing it to the AES is perhaps not fair. But I have some issues with the hardware that may actually be a manufacturing-fault. Read more below...

Mark Vergeer's picture

Clone GBA-SP system - the k1gba - a demonstration

A demonstration of a hardware compatible Gameboy Advance SP system that has the capabilities to run real GBA game cards as well as run files from an SD-card. The screen is much brighter and of a higher quality thn the original GBA-SP's screen and they seem to have used the exact same plastic molds as the original. Read more below...

Mark Vergeer's picture

3DS XL - System review (an in depth look)

-System overview (00:43)
-Comparison of the layout
-Comparison of the screens
-Demonstration of viewing angle
-Some information on the easy system transfer option (Internet connection required, you can also transfer your Ambassador status and extra games if you got the 3DS at launch) (10:30)
- An overview of the downloaded software I have
- Sound system
- Demonstration of fantastic 2D 'scanline-like' mode on the 3DS XL screen! (21:40) - this in my opinion makes the screen on this system superior to the regular 3DS screen.

The end sequence features a track created by ZombieAndy1979 'The Lake'
http://www.youtube.com/ZombieAndy1979

I got quite a few PMs and video responses on my last personal 3DS video - some wanted, asked or some even demanded a better more in depth look - so here it is. And not to worry - YT didn't screw up the framerate on this one :P

Bill Loguidice's picture

Why I canceled my PlayStation Vita pre-order

Well, I did it, I canceled my $359.96 pre-order of the Sony PlayStation Vita - WiFi, ModNation Racers: Road trip, Uncharted: Golden Abyss, and Hot Shots Golf on Amazon. It's not because it was too much money - it was - but I planned for it. It's not that I don't want it either - I do - but it simply doesn't make sense at this time. I have long gone on record - much to the chagrin of the Nintendo faithful - that I believe this is the last generational hurrah for dedicated gaming handhelds. In short, I believe they will still sell well this generation, just not anywhere near the heights of the last generation when the DS and PSP ruled the roost. I've given many reasons for this line of thinking, but I primarily chalk it up to smartphones and tablets being good enough as game machines and the inclination for most people to carry as few electronic devices as possible. In other words, would you rather have a device that does everything multimedia and Internet effortlessly (and, as a smartphone, makes phone calls and texts), and has inexpensive apps (and a great camera for stills and video, etc.), as well as plays good games, or would you rather have a device that plays really good games (thanks mostly to onboard physical controls), but is mediocre (or incapable) at everything else and has expensive apps? Some of us will have both, but many of us will only choose the most logical of the two. If you look at the issue without the emotion of a dedicated gamer, there really is no good argument for having anything other than a smartphone and maybe a tablet in your portable arsenal, particularly since the former has an excuse to be with you 100% of the time.

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