sandy petersen

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Sandy Petersen's Cthulhu World Combat Kickstarter

You may remember my interviews with Sandy Petersen a few episodes back. In case you missed them, here's what you need to know: This is the guy that did the Cthulhu games for Chaosium back in 1981--pen and paper games that are still being enjoyed today. Now he's back with a Kickstarter project called Cthulhu World Combat, a turn-based strategy game based on H.P. Lovecraft's twisted mindscapes.

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Matt Chat 168: Sandy Petersen on id and Ensemble

Here's the last installment of my interview with Sandy Petersen. We chat about his time on id, which includes a lengthy section on Sandy's philosophy of level design. Then we move on to Ensemble, with a discussion of team sizes and Microsoft's callous treatment of this hardworking and proven team. We wrap up with a chat about jobs and what Sandy likes to see on a resume.

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Matt Chat 166: Sandy Petersen on why paper game designers make better videogames

I'm back this week with part 2 of my interview with Sandy Petersen. In this episode, the maestro of pen & paper games talks about how people like him are better qualified to make videogames than those who jump straight to pixels. In short, the answer is diversity--paper games have it, videogames don't. Sandy also talks about Elf Quest, which he considers a failure, and Ghostbusters, whose innovative system inspired the Star Wars RPG (though unacknowledged). We also chat about his early computer games for Microprose, including Lightspeed and Hyperspeed, and why Sandy turned to the dark side.

Download the MP4 here.
What do you think about Sandy's argument? Would you like to see as much variety in the videogame market as we see in pen & paper games? Sound off below!

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Matt Chat 165: Sandy Petersen, Master of Horror RPGs

This week I roll out the first installment of my interview with Sandy Petersen, author of The Call of Cthulhu role-playing game and all-around gaming icon. Sandy has some very interesting theories about what makes a game scary for players; a lot of what he says will resonate with fans of survival horror games as well as H.P. Lovecraft's stories.

Download the video here.

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