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Mark Vergeer's picture

My Experiences With The OUYA, What Are Yours?

OUYA Game ConsoleOUYA Game ConsoleA couple of months in I really really want to like it but I don't. I really don't. The concept is very cool, the Indie games for it are really cool and there's some great emulators out there for it BUT... there are too many negatives to make this right.

The controller just isn't up to standards, the thumb-pad touches the sides of the mold so it feels cheap and not well designed. What this also creates is a feeling of unresponsiveness on the thumb-pad button itself as it seems to get stuck in a depressed position quite often. The analog joysticks are actually the best bit of the controllers as they are of a good quality, but they do grind on the top of the controller's surface-plates creating a lot of plastic powder that will no doubt foul up button functionality in the future. The action buttons suffer a similar fate as the thumb-pad button - the holes on the surface of the controller are too narrow with too little margins for the buttons to move freely so they end up actually getting caught underneath the top of the controller. The touch interface area / mousepad is on the controller is actually quite nifty.

But there's more, read below to find out what it is...

Mark Vergeer's picture

GameMID Android Handheld Review - an 1hr in depth look (including gameplay & benchmarks) (HD)


A review of the GameMID Android Handheld produced by REP Electronics Ltd (Hong Kong based) that will be brought to the market by various vendors under various brands. My unit comes with 8Gb of memory, the bare minimum will be 4Gb, but 16Gb or 32Gb of Flash memory is possible depending on ways the resellers would like the setup.

This video contains a look at the device itself, the specifications, some live gameplay, a look at its guts, benchmarking it and comparing it to the JXD S3700B, the Archos Gamepad and the Nexus 7, HDMI captured gameplay of various Android native games and various emulators. Read more below.

Matt Barton's picture

Kickstarter-Funded Games: Are We Asking for Too Little?

As someone who has been to bat for several Kickstarter projects lately, I'm becoming concerned with what's going to happen on the other end. After all this community support, will it be back to business as usual when the products hit the shelves? Will all this "fan outreach" end when they start worrying about maximizing their sales?

How will I feel when the games that I've not only helped fund, but--like many of you, have also promoted heavily with every social media tool at my disposal--how will I feel if those games end up on the shelf with the same kind of closed-source, DRM-encrusted, shrinkwrap-licensed bullshit that plagues the rest of the industry?

After some preliminary research, I've found that while most of the big game projects at least promise a DRM free version (at least as a limited option to backers), there are few promises that they will *exclusively* offer DRM free versions.

Let's consider how some of the Kickstarters I've supported are handling these issues:

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