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Matt Barton's picture

Matt Chat 177: Dave Marsh on Shadowgate and Kickstarters

Shadowgate designer Dave Marsh returns to the show this week to talk about ICOM Simulations' Macventure series. We also chat about Kickstarter and why his earlier effort, Sherlock Holmes: Consulting Detective, failed to reach an audience.

You can download the show here.

Bill Loguidice's picture

The Last of the Power Personal Computers?

My, how plans change. I was all but dead set on waiting for Windows 8 to come out and then getting a new kick butt PC, but the more the Windows 8 story has publicly evolved, the more I realize that that's probably not a direction I want to go. This led me to go on a search for a new PC now, one that I've decided may end up lasting me until it no longer makes sense to have the type of PC we traditionally consider "killer." Let me explain why I think this is an inevitability...

Bill Loguidice's picture

Back in my day we used something called a "desktop computer" that stayed in one place, and we liked it!

I had recently written about what I perceive to be the false notion of console gaming holding PC gaming back (and, frankly, with a recent release like L.A. Noire and future releases like Skyrim, again, it's hard to make that argument outside of a purely superficial (audio/visual) - not contentual - standpoint). Perhaps, as this new article puts forth, it's not consoles, but tablets, that the traditional PC industry has more to worry about?

Of course, as far as I'm concerned, we're actually still at least a few years off from that happening, at least until Apple breaks the required link between their iOS devices and a computer equipped with iTunes (and that's a question of "when", not "if"). Android devices are of course close to completely breaking free of the computer tether, but there are other issues for those classes of devices to overcome first. Other tablet OS's, present and future, are probably somewhere in-between the two.

Interestingly, there's a girl here at my day job who had bought an iPad 2 about a month back and then recently got an iPhone 4, but was frustrated that there was no way to copy what was on her iPad 2 (purchases) over to the iPhone 4. You see, she considers her computer horribly outdated and really didn't want to go through iTunes on her rickety old PC! Obviously, very flawed thinking, but it's very interesting what the non-techies have in their thought processes (and in this case how she wants to basically compute outside of work exclusively on the iPad 2 and iPhone 4)... Definitely a paradigm shift of some type! In any case, it's the old argument that it's not so much computers that are being challenged, it's the limited generalized definition of what a computer is that is being challenged. Does a computer really mean that desktop or laptop many of use a good portion of the day? Sure, but that's not all it means. As an iPad 2 user - outside of the tethering restriction for the occasional iTunes sync - I can argue that my tablet is as much of a computer as most desktops and laptops, with strikingly similar functionality (and in some cases, then some).

Ultimately, I think it's clear we're all headed to a connected eco-system of devices, where a lot of stuff is in the cloud, with minimal need for local storage. You'll simply use whatever device is handy or whatever is best suited to a particular task (say a touch screen or a keyboard). We even already have brilliantly functional cloud gaming services (and of course, VOD, like Netflix), so, outside of artificial bandwidth restrictions by ISP's, there's little reason to think that the future has anything to do with increasingly more powerful traditional computers. For some of us who have been in love with technology since our earliest memories, this is a tough sell, but it's hard to argue that's not where we're headed, and perhaps it's just as hard to argue that it's even a bad a thing. I'm sure even the most hardcore among us have tired of the upgrade/incompatibility/instability cycle at some point, if only briefly.

Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: March 27th, 2011

Three for the Road[ MAR . 27 . 2011 ]
 

Three for the Road: 03.27.2011

Greetings folks! Welcome to the March 27th, 2011 edition of Three for the Road.

This week we take a look at a retro style platform game where you try to save the dinosaurs from extinction.. a shoot'em up where music plays an integral role in the gameplay.. and a recent scene re-release for the venerable Commodore 64.

Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: February 13th, 2011

Three for the Road[ FEB . 13 . 2011 ]
 
 02.13.2011Greetings folks! Welcome to the February 13th, 2011 edition of Three for the Road. This week I take a look at a brand new "One-Handed" arena shooter (It's not quite as deviant as it sounds), A Tetris style puzzler that comes complete with 38 variations, and finally a fantastic retro style platform game with a deep back-story.
Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: January 16th, 2011.

Three for the Road[ JAN . 16 . 2011 ]
 
 01.16.2011Greetings folks! Welcome to the January 16th, 2011 edition of Three for the Road. As always, we have a nice collection of indie developed titles for you to check out.

First up, is a multiplatform (Win, Mac and Linux) implementation of the Tron light cycle concept. Second, a modern day remake of SkyRoads that, if anything, is even harder than the original. This game is also multiplatform (Win, Mac and Linux). And third, an action adventure game about a man who is suffering amnesia and finds himself stranded in the tundra.. Now he must piece together what happened and who he is. This game is Windows only, but is available in it's native French language or English.

Enjoy.

Chip Hageman's picture

Quick Peeks: F-1 Spirit: The way to Formula-1

Quick Peeks[ DEC . 22 . 2010 ]
 
 The Way to Formula-1Way back in the golden age of video games, the humble racing game was nary more then a line on either side of the screen with an amorphous blob in the center to denote your "car". And you know what? It was damn fun to play.

In the ensuing years, the genre pulled itself up by it's proverbial boot straps, dusted itself off and started down the road (pun intended) to refinement... Adding better graphics, physics based handling, simulating realistic weather and track conditions and emulating the driving behavior of famous drivers.

Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: December 12th, 2010.

Three for the Road[ DEC . 12 . 2010 ]
 
Greetings folks. This Sunday I've got a great selection of titles for you to check out. We will take a look at Stu and Smila's new retro Commodore 64 style platform game, Kot-in-Action's new episodic top-down shoot'em-up and Uglysoft's new off-the-wall take on J-RPG's.

This is not one to be missed, so stop on by.

Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: Chromatron, Cobex, 7th Swarming of the Machines

Three for the Road
>> Dec. 5th, 2010: Chromatron, COBEX: Cruising on Broadway Extra, 7th Swarming of the Machines.

Welcome back to Three for the Road. This week we have another line up of quality indie titles for you to check out. One puzzle game which is reminiscent of one of my favorite Commodore 64 puzzlers, One maze game with it's roots entrenched in two of classic gamings greatest titles, and one experimental platformer that shows the industry what kind of fun can be had when you start breaking all the rules.

Check it all out here!

Chip Hageman's picture

Three for the Road: Packin' Plax, Big Box of Blox and BlockOut 8k

Three for the Road
·  · ·· November 28st, 2010: Big Box of Blox, BlockOut 8k and Packin' Plax ·· ·  ·

Welcome back to Three for the Road. So I've been sitting here this morning lounging to some Richard Cheese and trying to figure out what we should take a look at. So far we've covered quite a few platformers and shoot'em up's but we haven't checked out that many puzzlers...

So that's just what we're going to do this week.

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