books

Bill Loguidice's picture

A visual summary of our major books, films, and courses to date

As we start to prepare for the new Armchair Arcade Website, I wanted to take a moment to look back and share a quick visual summary of sorts of the major book, film, and course projects Christina and I have completed to date and were published/went live over roughly the past six years. While I sometimes feel like my promotional efforts are sometimes a bit much - and I'm sure a few of you out there have grown tired of it all by now - I'd like to point out the simple fact that that's the only advertising or direct requests for money, funding, or support we've ever really had for Armchair Arcade and all we ever really plan to have (and obviously this works in conjunction with the Amazon affiliate links). By supporting these projects with purchases, reviews (particularly on Amazon!), etc., that not only allows us to keep Armchair Arcade (aka, "that site that's been around since 2003") running, but also helps to keep us producing those same types of projects for various publishers and related entities (i.e., they know there's interest in this stuff out there). You can see a link to all our books, here, our film's Website, here, and Christina's Medical Writing course, here. As always, we sincerely thank everyone for their support and look forward to you joining us when we unveil what will be the third major revision of Armchair Arcade since its initial launch more than a decade ago, which will make commenting on and sharing content far superior to anything we've done in the past. Thank you.

Matt Barton's picture

Matt Chat 193: Neal Hallford on Swords & Circuitry

I'm back this week with part three of my interview with Neal Hallford, designer of Betrayal at Krondor. In this installment, we chat about why Ron Gilbert's Cavedog company failed followed by a discussion of Neal's book Swords & Circuitry, the best-ever guide to creating your own computer role-playing games.

Download the mp4 here.
Sadly, Neal's Thief of Dreams kickstarter failed, but a third party has emerged to back him anyway.

Bill Loguidice's picture

My PlayStation Vita book release and free sample, PlayStation Plus comes to Vita, and Vita's Black Friday Deals

My PlayStation VitaMy PlayStation VitaIt's a busy time for the Sony PlayStation Vita handheld. Due for release within a week at fine retailers everywhere, our latest book, My PlayStation Vita, is available for immediate pre-order at a great low price (Amazon is only $15.93, for instance, for the paperback, and $9.99 for the Kindle version!). You can use Amazon's look inside feature to get an idea of the great content, or download a PDF of Chapter 5 and the Index, direct from publisher Que. You can think of My PlayStation Vita as the Vita's missing manual, and your friendly guide to all of the powerful handheld's hardware features, apps, games, and overall capabilities.

In addition, today, Sony has brought the best deal in gaming, PlayStation Plus, to Vita owners. For a low monthly, quarterly, or yearly price (which is less than the price of a single game!), PlayStation Plus not only gives you regular discounts on games and game content, but also a selection of free games every month. The best part is these are often full blown retail games or AAA downloadable titles. The first batch of freebies are none other than: Uncharted Golden Abyss, Gravity Rush, Wipeout 2048, Jet Set Radio, Final Fantasy Tactics, and Mutant Blobs Attack. All of those amazing games and more each month are yours to keep and play as much as you want as long as you're a current PlayStation Plus member. This is all in addition to similar freebies you get for the PlayStation 3. Best deal in gaming indeed... Finally, if you don't already have a Vita, there are some nice bundles available, and Sony has indicated that a particularly intriguing offer is coming Black Friday: $199.99 for your choice of system and game bundle. Can't beat that!

So, to sum up, check out the book, then buy the book, and then take advantage of all the great deals and get to playing and tapping into the full potential of the Vita. If you're a fan of great gaming and amazing technology, you won't be sorry!

Keith Burgun's picture

My book on game design!

Hi everyone! I really need to post here more often. But, between AURO and several other smaller projects, I've been super busy!

Christina Loguidice's picture

Working on our newest book: My PlayStation Vita

My PlayStation VitaMy PlayStation VitaBill and I are happy to announce that we're hard at work on our next book, My PlayStation Vita, which will follow a format similar to our previous book, My Xbox. My PlayStation Vita is due out in the latter part of 2012 and will cover usage of all the major features of Sony's powerful handheld. There are other exciting projects we'll be working on both individually and together in 2012 and beyond, including another videogame-related book and two special projects in the medical field. As always, we'll keep you informed of the latest happenings. For now, check out the marketing blurb for My PlayStation Vita, and thank you for the continued support:

Matt Barton's picture

Huge PlayStation Retrospectives Book

Good news for all you Sony PlayStation (PS1) fans out there--a 436 page book filled with PS1 retrospectives. It's a print-on-demand book from GameSpite Quarterly, put together by one Jeremy Parish. It's an attractive volume available in paperback ($20) and hardcover ($44). Here's a little blurb from the intro to set the tone: Perhaps more importantly, the PlayStation grew up alongside the World Wide Web, making it the first game console whose audience was connected both to one another and to the latest news the world over. PlayStation was where gaming grew up -- not in the sense of its newfound “mature” content, but rather in the breadth and sophistication of its software. It wasn’t 32-bit technology that marked the birth of gaming’s modern age. No, it was very specifically the PlayStation.

Matt Barton's picture

Paul Reiche and Fred Ford's Science Fiction Reading List

In my Matt Chat interviews with Fred Ford and Paul Reiche, the duo proposed updating their 1991 list of science fiction novels and stories for aspiring game designers. They've also added a few fantasy authors to "keep us guessing!" How many of these fine authors have you read?

Matt Barton's picture

Gnome's Lair Interviews Mike Rose, author of 250 Indie Games You Must Play

Our good friend Konstantinos of Gnome's Lair has posted an interview with Mike Rose, author of the upcoming book 250 Indie Games You Must Play. The book and the author sound great! I think this will definitely be a must-have for all of us interested in truly innovative game development. Perhaps it's a bit controversial, but I really like the fact that he focused on PC/Mac indie games, and every game in the book will play on a modern PC. That's of course good news for anyone who's worried that a particular title will is unavailable on their available platforms (I'm actually quite curious about what notable indie titles are NOT available on PC or Mac). The book is also sprinkled with quotations from designers and developers and boasts color screenshots. Please buy the book using the link to the left to support Armchair Arcade.
Matt Barton's picture

Pete's Game Room Unboxes Game Books (Including Vintage Games!)

Pete's Game Room has done a nice unboxing video with 5 great videogame books.

Matt Barton's picture

My Thoughts on Ian Bogost's Unit Operations

Unit OperationsUnit OperationsI just finished reading Ian Bogost's book Unit Operations: An Approach to Videogame Criticism, a book that is probably already considered a foundational work for game studies. The book is clearly written for professional academics steeped in literary theory and with some smattering of reading in computer science, philosophy, and other fields. I can't tell if his tongue is in his cheek or not when he writes in the preface, "Jargon and obfuscation is a way of laying groundwork for novel production" and that his theory, like any other, "can't be obvious" (ii). However, there are plenty of kernels of interest to anyone with a serious interest in understanding games and, perhaps more importantly, the role they play and can play in our society and culture. In this review, I'll try to break down the book's key ideas.

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